Hand Tufted Rugs

by NimaRaisdana on August 7, 2012

Hand tufted rugs are constructed by technique called tufting. Tufting involves inserting the pile through a cloth canvas or duck backing with the aid of a ‘tufting gun’. The back is then coated with latex and is normally covered with a piece of cloth. Tufted rugs take considerably less time to make than hand knotted rugs because a tufting tool is used and this reduction in construction time is reflected in the price of the tufted rugs compared to a hand knotted rug. But, this does not necessarily mean that a tufted rug is inferior to a hand knotted rug. A tufted rug can have just as comparable or even better quality wools and dyes and be at fraction of the price of a hand knotted rug due to the reduced construction and labor cost in its creation

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Hand Knotted Rugs

by NimaRaisdana on August 7, 2012

In hand knotted rugs the pile is created by tying a short length of yarn around two adjacent warp strands so that the ends of the yarn protrude upwards to form the surface which is called the pile of the rug. This process is referred to as ‘knotting’, because when the weft and warp strands are beaten together to hold the yarn in place, a securely tied knot is formed. In Oriental rugs, every knot is tied by hand, and a skilled weaver can tie something in the region of a thousand knots per hour.

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Flat Weave Rugs

August 7, 2012

Flat Weave rugs are constructed by tightly interweaving the warp and weft strands to create a flat, pile less surface. The design is produced by threading the weft strands through a number of the warp strands, rather than directly from edge to edge, and than looping them back around the last warp thread used. Each section of [...]

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Wool Rugs

August 7, 2012

Persian rug wool is the best and most widely used rug-making material. It is soft, durable and easy to work. However, the quality varies considerably and not all wool is suitable for rug making. Good Persian rug wool needs to combine softness with strength and springiness, or the rug wears out quickly and fails to [...]

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Wool and Silk Rugs

August 7, 2012

Silk is used either on its own or in combination with wool by a number of individual weaving groups in all major rug making countries. These rugs have the perfect combination of beauty and durability. In wool and silk rugs the wool is used in the pile of the rug allowing it to be extremely [...]

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Silk Rugs

August 7, 2012

The physical beauty of silk rugs is unsurpassed. These rugs are normally used as decorative, rather than functional examples of textile art. They are often displayed as as wall hangings or floor coverings in rooms that rarely see traffic. Silk is also used as a foundation material; it is extremely strong, keeps it shape, and [...]

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Turkish Rugs

August 7, 2012

It is common practice in the carpet trade to use the term “Anatolian” to describe items made in Turkey, although they may also be referred to as Turkish of Turkey rugs.

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Tibetan Rugs

August 7, 2012

Very high quality rugs are being produced by Tibetans in Nepal as well as Tibet. They are largely faithful to traditional Tibetan designs, but the vivacious, even garish colors have been considerably subdued to produce pale, pastel shades. They are well made, using excellent quality wool.

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Romanian Rugs

August 7, 2012

Romania is the largest and most influential rug making regions in the Balkans. They make a wide range of qualities, sizes and designs. Each grade named after a town, river or mountain (which has no connection with where the rug was actually made), but all grades are produced in the traditional Persian and Caucasian designs.

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Iranian Rugs

August 7, 2012

Persia is seen as the spiritual, if not actual, home of rug making and its name has become synonymous with the finest and most outstanding achievements in oriental textile art. Much of this is due to the magnificent Court carpets of the 16th and 17th centuries which grace Western museums, and the 18th and 19th [...]

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